Media round-up: Lincoln MKC revealed to enthusiastic reviews

It is fair to say that Lincoln is one of those brands that has to work extra hard to get the coverage and enthusiasm other manufacturers get by default when they release a new car or even announce a new strategy through a simple press release it seems: when a new Lexus is released, no matter how polarizing the design or traditional the packaging, the presumption will be that it is the right car at the right time.

Just last week-end I was watching the (otherwise highly professional) TV show “RPM” on Quebec’s “V” channel and was treated to an in-depth review of the 2.0 EcoBoost MKZ. The journalist commended Lincoln on a striking exterior, plush and tech-savvy interior, as well as impressive handling and performance despite the car’s mid-range mechanical packaging. Perhaps biased by my interest for this car, I expected the journalist’s overall opinion to live up to his genuine interest in the car’s individual features; unfortunately, the wrap-up was less than lukewarm, dismissing the MKZ simply because there were other alternatives on the market and blaming Lincoln’s “image deficit”. My bias may be talking but I feel the cause of this very deficit is that they themselves dismiss Lincoln’s offering from the start because it is acknowledged in many circles that it is not a marque worth rooting for.

It happens to others, but today giving Lincoln a hard time seems a little unfair: there were some ups and downs through the model years, when product was sometimes scarce and lacked distinction but I find the new MKZ is a true turning point and can only hope buyers will go past the cliches and discover the car for what is has to offer.

So, to come back to the topic of this article, when I went through the “buff books” to see what had been said on the new MKC crossover, I must say I was a little scared. I’d say just a little because the Lincoln MKC Concept received in its days a pretty warm welcome, including from some of the brand’s most skeptical critics.

Fortunately, I was quickly relieved. From Autoblog to the tough crowd at Jalopnik, from MotorTrend to Car & Driver, the reaction was actually enthusiastic!

It’s one of the better applications of Lincoln’s new design language we’ve seen thus far, and the end result is a taut-looking crossover that is at the same time both modern and luxurious-looking. […] [W]ith a fresh-faced product with solid architecture, the MKC looks to be a pretty solid offering. -Autoblog

But the surprise was the Lincoln MKC. In keeping with more of the Audi influences with the rest of the design, the wood on this particular auto show car was totally unshiny. You could get a good feel of the grain, too, and the color isn’t too yellow. It’s really nice, and wouldn’t look out of place in a German crossover. -Jalopnik

Handsomeness, it has it. A sharp arrow in the MKC’s quiver, its handsome styling will be crucial in the battle against Lincoln’s brand perception. The discreetly upscale, compositively German aesthetic of last January’s MKC concept has carried over almost completely unchanged, with the aggressive shoulder line, reimagined split-wing grille, and Audi-style clamshell liftgate all making the cut for production. -Car & Driver

Throughout, the MKC features top-quality materials all around. Most of the surfaces are wrapped in soft leather with accent stitching running across the dash, doors, seats, and console. The wood is real, the plastics are high-quality, and the headliner and pillars are soft, woven fabric. The panel gaps are tight throughout and the fit and finish is excellent. -MotorTrend

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4 responses to “Media round-up: Lincoln MKC revealed to enthusiastic reviews

  1. Pingback: 2015 Lincoln MKC: The Well-Heeled Contender, part 1 | The Mark of Lincoln·

  2. Pingback: 2015 Lincoln MKC: The Well-Heeled Contender, Part 2 | The Mark of Lincoln·

  3. Pingback: Media Round-Up: 2015 Lincoln MKC first drives | The Mark of Lincoln·

  4. Pingback: Media round-up: Lincoln Continental Concept exceeds expectations! | The Mark of Lincoln·

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